Olympic Games > Team USA Lineup

The biographies below of the eight representatives for Team USA for trap and skeet were generously provided by USA Shooting. These talented shotgunners will head to Tokyo, Japan, this summer to compete at the Olympic Games from July 23 to August 8.

The majority of action shots provided here were taken at the U.S. Olympic Shotgun Team Trials in March 2020 at the Tucson Trap & Skeet Club in Tucson, Arizona. Other photos were taken at the Fort Worth Trap & Skeet Club in Fort Worth, Texas.

Tokyo 2020 Shotgun Events

  • Men’s Skeet
  • Women’s Skeet
  • Men’s Trap
  • Women’s Trap
  • Mixed Team Trap

New at the Tokyo 2020 Games: Three mixed team events will make their debut at the Tokyo 2020 games including Mixed Team Trap. This mixed team event replaces the Men’s Double Trap event last contested in Rio 2016.


Vincent Hancock 

  • Event: Men’s Skeet 

  • Date of Birth: 3/19/1989 

  • Hometown: Eatonton, Georgia 

  • Residence: Ft. Worth, Texas 

  • Notable: Two-time Olympic gold Medalist and only skeet athlete to win repeat gold in the Olympics (2008, 2012), Four-time Olympian (2008, 2012, 2016, 2020) 

  • Competition Highlights 

  • 2019 World Cup Changwon and World Cup Acapulco Gold Medalist 

  • 2019 World Cup Acapulco, Gold Medalist 

  • 2018 World Cup Changwon, World Cup Siggiewi, and World Cup Guadalajara Gold Medalist 

  • 2012 Olympic Games Gold Medalist  

  • 2008 Olympic Games Gold Medalist (New Olympic Record and Final Olympic Record)  

 

Personal: Vincent Hancock started competing when he was 11 years old. In 2005, at age 16, Hancock won his first World Championship title in Men’s Skeet and went on to win the prestigious International Shooting Sport Federation’s Shooter of the Year award. 

His Gold-Medal victories in Bejing 2008 and London 2012 put him in elite company having become the first Olympic Skeet shooter to win Gold Medals in the same event in consecutive Olympic Games. 

Earning his fourth World Championship title in 2018, Hancock is the first person ever to win four World titles in Men’s Skeet, eclipsing Abdullah Alrashidi of Kuwait and Jury Tsuranov of the Soviet Union. Hancock is also now one of three men in the Shotgun discipline to earn four world titles in his career, joining Michel Carrega of France and Giovanni Pellielo of Italy. 

Hancock is a two-time Olympic champion, four-time World Champion, 16-time World Cup medalist (including 12 wins) and five-time World Cup Finals medalist. 

Also, an everyday family man, Vinny continues to give back to his sport as a mentor, coach, and ambassador.  

He’ll be attending his fourth straight Olympics in Tokyo this summer. 


Phillip Jungman 

  • Event: Men’s Skeet 

  • Date of Birth: 6/11/1995 

  • Hometown: Caldwell, Texas 

  • Residence: Phenix City, Alabama 

  • Notable: Medaled in every USA Shooting Shotgun Spring/Fall Selection from 2015-2020 

  • Competition Highlights 

  • 2020 National Championships Silver Medalist 

  • 2019 USA Shooting Spring Selection Match Gold Medalist  

  • 2019 USA Shooting Olympic Trials Silver Medalist  

  • 2018 World Championship Team Member and Olympic Quota Winner 

  • 2016 National Championships Gold Medalist 

 

Personal:  

Shooting has not only been fun for Phillip Jungman, but it’s also become a big part of his life. Phillip was raised in Caldwell, Texas, and got his start with his local 4-H club’s shooting safety classes. He joined the Brazon 4H Sportsman’s Club at the age of eight and started competing in International skeet at the age of 11. Phillip made his first junior national team at 16 and kept climbing.

Upon graduating from Caldwell high in 2013, he attended Texas A&M and Blinn College for 3.5 years before choosing to join the Army. Phillip is assigned to the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit in Ft. Benning Georgia as shooter/instructor. He’s been in the Army for just over three years now. 

Since the postponement of the Tokyo Games, Phillip announced he would be spending his off hours giving back to the community as a Little League umpire. Phillip says, “Contrary to what people say, it’s not always about where you’re headed. Giving back to community events is important to me because those same events have shaped me into the competitor I am today.”  


Amber English 

  • Event: Women’s Skeet 

  • Date of Birth: 10/25/1989 

  • Hometown: Colorado Springs, Colorado 

  • Residence: Phenix City, Alabama 

  • Notable: Four-time World Cup Medalist (2010, 2016, 2018, 2019)  

  • Competition Highlights 

  • 2019 World Cup AL Ain Bronze Medalist 

  • 2019 World Cup Lahti Bronze Medalist 

  • 2018 Championship of the Americas (CAT Games) Gold Medalist 

  • 2018 World Cup Siggiewi Bronze Medalist  

  • 2018 World Cup Changwon Bronze Medalist  

Personal:  

Amber English began shooting at the age of six and is a member of a distinguished shooting family. Her father Mike and uncle Butch were U.S. Running Target National Team members and Olympic Training center resident athletes while her mother Ana and aunt Kim were members of one of America's top collegiate rifle programs at the University of Kentucky. As a result, both hunting and shooting are recreational activities for the entire English family.  

Amber commenced competitive shooting in 2006 at age 17 when she began competing in women's skeet matches. After progressing up the ranks of International skeet shooting, she moved to the Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado to become a full-time resident athlete in 2013.  

She contended for a spot on both the 2012 and 2016 Olympic Teams but came up short both times which led Amber to join the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit (USAMU) in February 2017. In 2018, she was part of a U.S. sweep at World Championships where she earned the Bronze Medal. She has four world cup medals to her name won in 2010, 2016, 2018 and 2019. 

Amber is now set to compete in Tokyo as part of the Women’s Skeet Team and a first lieutenant with the World Class Athlete Program (WCAP) attached to the USAMU. 

Never considered one-dimensional, Amber continues to work towards a new Army officer career, regularly volunteers with various local youth organizations, and works with national conversation organizations. A lover of the outdoors, Amber enjoys hiking, fishing and hunting in the Colorado wilderness in and around the Rocky Mountains. 


Austen Smith 

  • Event: Women’s Skeet 

  • Date of Birth: 7/23/2001 

  • Hometown: Keller, Texas 

  • Residence: Keller, Texas 

  • Notable: 2019 Junior World Cup Champion, youngest member of the Tokyo 2020 U.S. Olympic Shooting Team 

  • Competition Highlights 

  • 2019 ISSF Junior World Cup Suhl Gold Medalist  

  • 2019 Junior World Championships Lonato Gold Medalist  

  • 2018 Junior World Championships Changwon Bronze Medalist 

  • 2017 Junior World Championships Moscow Silver Medalist  

Personal:  

Austen Smith had only been shooting six years and did not expect to make it to Tokyo given the depth and years of experience on the United States Women’s Skeet Team, many of whom she’s looked up to throughout her shooting career.  

At just 18 years old when she made her first Olympic Team in March 2020, Austen is the youngest member of the USA Shooting Olympic Team this cycle. She was competing on the junior circuit just a year prior.  

Austen won a Junior World Championship Silver Medal in 2017 and Bronze Medal in 2018, which she rounded out with a junior individual World Cup Gold Medal and junior mixed team Gold Medal in 2019.  

She graduated high school shortly after making the Olympic Team and enrolled in aerospace engineering at the University of Texas, Arlington. She says it gives her another challenge and another thing to focus on when she is unable to shoot due to COVID-19 restrictions and the postponement of the Games. 

Austen is coached by two-time Olympic Champion Vincent Hancock and will represent Team USA together on the same team this summer.  


Derrick Mein 

  • Events: Men’s Trap, Mixed Team Trap 

  • Date of Birth: 8/26/1985 

  • Hometown: Paola, Kansas 

  • Residence: Paola, Kansas 

  • Notable: 13-time National Sporting Clays State Champion  

  • Competition Highlights 

  • 2020 ATA Grand American AAA High-All-Around Champion 

  • 2020 NSSA world skeet 28-gauge Runner Up 

  • 2020 and 2017 National Sporting Clays Association (NSCA) National Champion 

  • 2019 ICTSF World English Sporting Champion 

  • 2018 World All-Around Champion 

  • 2018 US FITASC Grand Prix Champion 

Personal:  

Derrick grew up on a small farm in southeast Kansas and developed a love of the outdoors at an early age tagging along with his dad while quail and deer hunting. He started in sporting clays at age eight, joining his dad in a small league at a local club and began developing his skills as a competitive shooter.  

The shooting sports earned him a scholarship to Lindenwood University. While there, he was on dual scholarship for baseball and the shotgun team. After a couple years, he transferred to Kansas State University to pursue a degree in Animal Science, graduating in 2008. While at KSU, he won the ACUI Collegiate Clay Target Championship, a format that includes International trap, International skeet, American skeet, American trap and sporting clays. 

After college, he moved to Ohio where he designed and managed Cardinal Center Sporting Clays. Having successfully getting the facility up and going, he took the chance to move closer to home to manage Powder Creek Shooting Park in Lenexa, Kansas.  

During his years in the shooting sports, Derrick has competed in many different disciplines, including sporting clays, skeet, trap, international trap, and helice, winning national titles and earning Team USA honors in helice, International trap and sporting clays. Still to this day, Derrick enjoys shooting with his father and is regularly seen competing with him around the country in sporting clay events.  

Derrick has competed in just three world cups to date as part of the International trap discipline and is one of two men’s trapshooters to represent the United States at the Olympic Games in the past 12 years. 


Brian Burrows 

  • Events: Men’s Trap, Mixed Team Trap 

  • Date of Birth: 2/17/1988 

  • Hometown: Fallbrook, California 

  • Residence: Denton, Texas 

  • Notable: Won first Olympic trap Quota for the United States in 12 years at 2019 Pan American Games 

  • Competition Highlights 

  • 2019 Pan American Games Gold Medalist 

  • 2019 World Cup Acapulco Silver Medalist (Mixed Team)  

  • 2013 World Cup Acapulco Silver Medalist  

  • 2013 and 2012 National Championships Gold Medalist 

Personal: Brian began shooting at a very early age and was competing in the American Trap Association (ATA) by the age of eight. He’s a longtime USA Shooting National Team member from 2008 to 2016 and then 2018 to present day. Considered one of the world’s best trapshooters who had won at nearly every level possible, Brian had retired from competitive shooting since 2016 until one of his former coaches talked him into coming back to the sport.  

Brian is a collegiate national champion, All-American, two-time Pan American medalist, three-time national champion and a two-time World Cup medalist. He took home the Gold Medal at the Pan American Games in 2019, earning an Olympic quota spot for Team USA.  

In addition to Brian’s impressive shooting career, he is now a business owner. Brian opened Ironwood Axe Throwing in Denton, Texas (a recreational axe-throwing venue) with his brother Jon in the Fall of 2019.  

Brian will be one of only two men’s trapshooters to represent the United States at the Olympic Games in the past 12 years.   


Kayle Browning 

  • Women’s Trap, Mixed Team Trap 

  • Date of Birth: 7/9/1992 

  • Hometown: Wooster, Arkansas 

  • Residence: Wooster, Arkansas 

  • Notable: Top-13 finishes in the last two world championships  

  • Competition Highlights 

  • 2019 USA Shooting Olympic Trials Gold Medalist 

  • 2019 World Cup Acapulco, Silver Medalist (Mixed Team) 

  • 2018 Continental American Championships Gold Medalist (Olympic Quota winner) 

  • 2018 World Championships Tucson Bronze Medalist (Mixed Team) 

  • 2016 National Championships Silver Medalist 

Personal: Kayle began shooting at eight years old with her dad, an avid sporting clay shooter. She began her target career in sporting clays where she made the open All-American Team at just 12 years old. The following year, she attended a Junior Olympic Development Camp in Colorado Springs, Colorado, and decided to take up International trap.  

In 2007, Kayle was selected for the Shotgun Junior Olympic Team and later that year won the Bronze Medal in the National Junior Olympic Championships. Since then, she has won several national and international medals, set national and international records and currently has her sights set on the Tokyo Olympics this summer. 

At just 28 years old, Kayle has a 20-year shooting career and has been on the USAS team since she was only 15. She enjoys flipping houses (she’s a realtor), hunting, the beach and working her two dogs. Making an Olympic Team has been a dream since she started shooting. Fun fact, the laurel wreath translates to the meaning of her name. 


Madelynn Bernau 

  • Events: Women’s Trap, Mixed Team Trap 

  • Date of Birth: 1/6/1998 

  • Hometown: Waterford, Wisconsion 

  • Residence: Waterford, Wisconsin  

  • Notable: Made her international debut in 2018 where she brought home Gold Medals in both the individual and mixed team event  

  • Competition Highlights 

  • 2019 National Championships Collegiate Female Gold Medalist 

  • 2018 Junior World Championships Bronze Medalist (Team)  

  • 2018 Junior Grand Prix Gold Medalist 

  • 2018 Junior Grand Prix Gold Medalist (Mixed Team) 

  • 2018 USA Shooting Spring Selection Junior Bronze Medalist  

Personal:  

Madelynn’s (Maddy) clay target shooting experience began when she was just 12 years old at a local 4-H club, shooting American trap. A few years later, her father introduced her to her local high school team where she shot American trap, skeet and sporting clays through the Scholastic Clay Target Program (SCTP). Eventually, Maddy branched out into the more non-traditional disciplines such as doubles, handicap and 5-Stand.  

In the Spring of 2014, Maddy attended an SCTP development camp held at the Olympic and Paralympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The camp was designed to introduce young SCTP athletes into the Olympic disciplines of shotgun sports.  

Maddy began shooting in USA Shooting-sanctioned competitions in the summer of 2016 at the Junior Olympic Championships. She competed in her first selection match in Fort Benning, Georgia at the 2017 Spring Selection Match. In 2018, Maddy earned a spot on her first official USA Shooting Team to attend the World Championships in Changwon, Korea. She also earned a spot on the Junior National Team at the National Junior Olympic Championships right before attending the 2018 World Championships in the Fall.  

Normally after competing on the junior national level, the next step is the U.S. National Team. Maddy bypassed the normal progression and secured a spot on the United States Olympic Trap Team in March 2020. 


Coach: Jay Waldron 

Hometown: Puyallup, Washington  

Residence: Colorado Springs, Colorado 

Notable: 1992 Olympian, 1991 Pan American Champion  

Jay Waldron competed in Trap at the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, Spain, where he earned a spot in the Finals after shooting a 195/200. Throughout 1991 and 1992, he was a contender in almost every match he competed, including winning gold and silver in two 1992 World Cups and making Finals in three others. Waldron finished fifth in Trap and seventh in Double Trap at the 1991 World Championship in Perth, Australia, while also winning gold at the Pan American Games the same year in Havana, Cuba.   

Before his time at USA Shooting, Waldron coached at clubs throughout the state of Oregon. He became National Assistant Shotgun Coach in 2015 and helped grow the USAS Shotgun Team into the international powerhouse it remains today. 

Waldron assumed his new role as National Coach in July 2018. He jumped right in to lead the U.S. Team at the 2018 World Championships, winning four open medals that included a podium sweep in Women’s Skeet. Success with the Team continued into 2019, bringing home a whopping 23 open medals throughout the year.  

The Tokyo 2020 Games will be Waldron’s Olympic coach debut. 


Skeet: Athletes use a 12-gauge shotgun to shoot clay targets on eight different stations thrown from the two houses located on the left and right end of the range. The house on the left is called the High House, and the right is called the Low House. Athletes shoot one at a time, moving to the next station as soon as their squad is finished at the current station.

Qualification Round: In the Qualification Round each athlete shoots 125 clay targets divided in five rounds of 25 targets each. During qualification, athletes shoot from Station number 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8 rotating from left to right and shooting a single or double targets according to the station.

Final Round: The top six athletes from the Qualification Round compete in the Final Match for the medals. Bib numbers for the final round are given based on the athlete’s qualification score. Shoot-offs are used to break any ties to determine the top six athletes as well as their bib number if needed.

Qualification scores do not follow the athletes into the Final Round, meaning all athletes are starting with a score of 0. Athletes start by shooting two doubles from Station 3, one double on Station 4, and two more doubles on Station 5. After two rounds, the lowest-ranking athlete is eliminated (6th place). The final rounds continue with eliminations taking place after each round, (5th, 4th, 3rd) including the gold and silver medalists. Ties in elimination for 6th, 5th, 4th and 3rd place are broken according to bib numbers, (lowest bib number always wins), and ties for the gold and silver medalists are broken by shoot-offs.

Trap: Athletes use a 12-gauge shotgun to shoot clay targets on five different stations thrown from a trap located 17 meters in front of them. Athletes shoot one at a time, moving to the next station as soon as the following athlete has fired his/her shot.

Qualification Round: In the Qualification Round each athlete shoots 125 clay targets divided in five rounds of 25 targets each. During qualification, athletes shoot from Station number 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, rotating from left to right and shooting five times at every station. The sixth athlete on the squad is positioned behind station 1, where he/she waits to move to Station 1 and shoot after the athlete on Station 5 has fired their shot. During qualification, two shots can be fired at each target.

Final Round: The top six athletes from the Qualification Round compete in the Final Match for the medals. Bib numbers for the final round are given based on the athlete’s qualification score. Shoot-offs are used to break any ties to determine the top six athletes as well as their bib number if needed.

Qualification scores do not follow the athletes into the Final Round, meaning all athletes are starting with a score of 0. Athletes start by shooting from Station 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, rotating the same way as in the qualification phase. After five rounds have been completed, or every shooter has fired five times from each station, the lowest-ranking athlete is eliminated (6th place). The final rounds continue with eliminations taking place after each round (five shots, one per each station) to determine 5th, 4th and 3rd place. To determine the gold and silver medalists, shooters must fire two more complete rounds.

Ties in elimination for 6th, 5th, 4th and 3rd place are broken according to bib numbers, (lowest bib number always wins), and ties for the gold and silver medalists are broken by shoot-offs.

During the final round (to determine gold and silver medalists) and the shoot-offs, only one shot can be fired at each target.

Mixed Team Trap: Two athletes (one man and one woman from each country) will compete on a team for the Trap Mixed Team Event. Athletes use a 12-gauge shotgun to shoot clay targets on five different stations thrown from a trap located 17 meters in front of them. Athletes shoot one at a time, moving to the next station as soon as the following athlete has fired his/her shot.

Qualification Round: In the Qualification Round, each athlete shoots 75 clay targets (150 targets per team) divided in three rounds of 25 targets each. During qualification, athletes are grouped in a squad of six athletes, three teams per squad who all shoot from Station number 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, rotating from left to right and shooting five times at every station. The sixth athlete on the squad is positioned behind Station 1, where he/she waits to move to station 1 and shoot after the athlete on Station 5 has fired his/her shot. During qualification, two shots can be fired at each target.

Medal Rounds: The top six teams from the Qualification Round compete in the Final Match for the medals. Bib numbers for the final round are given based on the athlete’s qualification score. Shoot-offs are used to break any ties to determine the top six athletes as well as their bib number if needed.

Qualification scores do not follow the athletes into the Final Round, meaning all teams are starting with a score of 0. Teammates start by shooting from Station 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, rotating the same way as in the qualification phase. After five rounds have been completed, or every team has fired five times from each station, the lowest-ranking team is eliminated (6th place). The final rounds continue with eliminations taking place after each round (five shots per athlete, one per each station) to determine 5th, 4th and 3rd place. To determine the gold and silver medalists, teams must fire two more complete rounds.

Ties in elimination for 6th, 5th, 4th and 3rd place are broken according to qualification score, and ties for the gold and silver medalists are broken by shoot-offs.

During the final round (to determine gold and silver medalists) and the shoot-offs, only one shot can be fired at each target.

Share this post